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Mongolian Hot Pot

How to Order Mongolian Skimmers

What it is and what it does!

Called a Mongolian or Chinese Hot Pot, Firepot, Fire Pot, or Chinese Fondue Pot, it is a large communal cooking and serving pot and the forerunner of our modern meat fondue pots.

The traditional use of the Mongolian Fire Pot is for making a soup broth, in which thinly sliced, bite size pieces of lamb or beef are cooked. The compartment under the chimney (tube) was originally for charcoal, to heat the ingredients very quickly.

Use it for meat and vegetable fondues. Or for cheese or chocolate and dessert fondues, if you are careful not to scald the ingredients.

This type of pot is still popular in Asian countries, but now it is made of aluminum or stainless steel, and uses a gas or electric source of heat. Still, copper makes the best fire pot, because of its wonderful ability to diffuse heat and conduct it quickly and easily throughout its surface. This cooks food more evenly, with a lower heat source than might normally be used with another pan, and prevents hot spots and sticking.

Our copper fire pot has an alcohol burner underneath it. A baffle in the tube helps to bring more heat to the pot. First cook the food in the pot or another utensil on the stove. The alcohol burner will do a good job of keeping the food hot while on the table. For the burner, use denatured alcohol or fondue fuel.

The copper is hand hammered in Italy. Its tiny facets make light shimmer, and also hide scratches that from time to time can occur with regular use.

The fire pot is lined inside with tin, to prevent acidic foods from adversely reacting with the copper.

Most use it as a serving piece, for soups, fondues, etc. From time to time, you'll see it in upscale restaurants, brought to your table for both its appeal and its serving functionality.


A Brief History

Mongolian Hot PotThe five main races of China are the Han of China proper, the Mongolians, the Tibetians, the Manchurians and the Muslim tribes. Outside the Great Wall lived the nomadic Mongols. Descendants of the great Kublain Khan, superb horsemen who in ancient times controlled an Empire stretching from Peking to Vienna. Here were the origins of the Mongolian Stove and many of the barbecued dishes of China.

At night, the nomadic tribes gathered around the cooking fires and prepared their simple meal. Chunks of meat were speared and cooked in a stew, bubbling in a primitive cauldron.

The gourmets of Peking and Japan transformed the simple Mongolian Pot into the festive dish we know today. Even so, it still appeals to our primitive love of fire, food and friendship.

The Muslim tribes, following the teaching of the Prophet, did not use pork in their diet, but Mutton. It was in this manner that mutton was introduced into the cuisine of China.


Use and Care of the Copper Mongolian Fire Pot

Always use low heat on the stove. Copper is an excellent conductor of heat. And always have liquid in the pot when it's being heated.

You'll probably need a ladle and fondue forks for serving. Each diner skewers thinly sliced, bite size pieces of food firmly with their forks, and dips cook the food in the pot; it won't take long to cook. Fondue forks come with different color handles or handle ends, so that each diner can identify their meal. Then use the ladle to serve, or remove, the liquids in the pot.

Review the information on our Fondue page for more tips on cooking fondues.

Instead of fondue forks, you can use tongs if you prefer to have someone serve the food to your guests.

Wash by hand; wooden handles don't like automatic dishwashers. Avoid scouring; if you experience sticking, heat some water in the pot to loosen foodstuffs, then use a nylon scourer to clean up.

If the tin lining gets scratched or wears off, it is still safe to cook in it. We recommend that you then limit your use of acidic foods in your recipes until you get it relined. Contact us for your tin relining needs.

Once in a while, you may wish to polish the copper pot. We recommend Wenol, which does not scratch the copper.


Recipes

Precious Ten Mongolian Pot

1/4 Lb. chicken breast, sliced as thin as possible
1/4 Lb. chicken livers, sliced as thin as possible
1/4 Lb. shelled, deveined shrimp, sliced thin
1/4 Lb. boned fish, sliced thin
2 Tbs. soy sauce
1 Tbs. sherry
1 Tsp. salt
1/8 Tsp. MSG (monosodium glutamate)
1/8 Tsp. pepper
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 diced scallion
1/2 Lb. spinach or celery cabbage, cut in thin strips
3 Cups chicken or turkey stock, canned and undiluted
1 slice of ginger, diced
2 Cups water

Set the table with all the ingredients arranged attractively on platters. Each place setting consists of a soup bowl, spoon and dipper.

Add water to the stock and bring to a boil on the kitchen stove.

Set the Mongolian Pot on the dining table, fill it with the boiling stock, and light the burner under the pot.

Add ingredients as desired. Simmer until tender and serve in the soup bowls. Guests may also use their dipper to obtain attractive morsels from the pot.

Serves 4 to 6
 

Peking Mongolian Stove

2 Cups chicken stock
5 Cups hot water
3 scallions, sliced in thin strips
6 dry mushrooms, soaked and sliced
4 Lbs. lean beef, sliced paper thin
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 slice ginger, diced
1 Tbs. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper

Dipping Sauce:
1 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup sherry
1/8 Tsp. pepper

Mix garlic, ginger, salt and pepper with chicken stock and water. Bring to a boil on the kitchen stove.

Bring the Mongolian Pot to the dining table, fill it with the hot mixture, and light the burner under the pot.

Add the scallions and mushrooms and allow to boil.

Set the table with the meat attractively arranged on small dishes surrounding the Mongolian pot. Each guest's place is set with a soup bowl and spoon, small dish of dipping sauce and either a slim bamboo skewer or cocktail fork.

Guests cook their own slices of meat in the boiling broth and then dip them into the sauce. Afterwards, soup is served from the Mongolian Pot.

Serves 4 to 6
 

Chrysanthemum Stove

2 Cups fresh white chrysanthemum petals, washed thoroughly
1/4 Lb. chicken breasts, sliced as thinly as possible
1/4 Lb. chicken livers, sliced as thinly as possible
1/4 Lb. shrimp, shelled, deveined and sliced as thin as possible
1/4 Lb. cooked ham, shredded
1/4 Lb. spinach or Chinese cabbage, cut in thin strips
3 Cups canned, undiluted chicken or turkey stock
4 Cups water
1/2 Cup soy sauce
1 Tsp. salt
1/8 Tsp. MSG
1 scallion, diced
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 slice ginger, diced

Set the table with all the ingredients arranged attractively on platters. Each place setting consists of a soup bowl, spoon and dipper.

Add water to the stock and bring to a boil on the kitchen stove.

Set the Mongolian Pot on the dinner table, fill it with the boiling stock, and light the burner underneath.

Add ingredients as desired. Simmer until tender and serve in the soup bowls. Guests may also use their dippers to obtain attractive morsels from the Mongolian Pot.

Serves 4 to 6
 

Mongolian Mutton Stove

2 Cups canned, undiluted chicken or turkey stock
5 Cups hot water
6 dry mushrooms, soaked and sliced
3 scallions, sliced in thin strips
4 Lbs. mutton or lamb, sliced paper thin
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 slice ginger, diced
1 Tbs. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper

Mix garlic, ginger, salt and pepper with stock and water. Bring to a boil on the kitchen stove.

Place the Mongolian Pot on the dinner table, fill with the hot mixture, and light the burner underneath.

Add the scallions and mushrooms and allow to boil.

Set the table with the paper thin mutton or lamb slices arranged attractively on small dishes surrounding the Mongolian Pot. Each guest's place is set with a soup bowl and spoon, slim bamboo skewer or cocktail fork.

Guests spear their own slices of mutton or lamb and cook them by immersing them in the boiling broth.

Soup is served afterwards from the Mongolian Pot.

Serves 4 to 6
 

Some Recipes on the web:
www.epicurious.com
www.fatfree.com/recipes/chinese/mongolian-hot-pot
www.asian-recipe.com/mongolia/mongolian-meat-dishes.html

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